Adi Sankaracharya, Advaita Vedanta, Indian Philosophy

THE PROBLEM WITH THE CREATION THEORY

Usually the three main qualities that the God supposed to have are as follows: Omnipresent, Omniscient and Omnipotent; i.e. Omni-triad. Most of the religions give all of these qualities to god. Now, it has become a must that god should have these three qualities; else god would not qualify to consider as the Supreme and… Continue reading THE PROBLEM WITH THE CREATION THEORY

Advaita Vedanta, Buddhist Philosophy, Indian Philosophy, Upanishads, Vedas

PRAMĀNA: THE SOURCE OF KNOWLEDGE

Whenever discussing Indian Philosophy, a note on the ‘Sources of knowledge’ (in Sanskrit, Pramāna) is unavoidable. Philosophy deals with external objects. So getting details about the external objects is crucial to formulate philosophic theories. There are various ways or means to know the outside objects. These means are commonly called as Pramāna or ‘Sources/methods of… Continue reading PRAMĀNA: THE SOURCE OF KNOWLEDGE

Advaita Vedanta, Indian Philosophy, Upanishads

Consciousness: The Substratum Of Human Experience

Are we seeing the objects around us like plants, animals, rocks, etc because we have eyes? Are we hearing various sounds from the outside world due to our ears? In the same way touch-skin, odour – nose, taste – tongue pairs also should be considered. Common man may answer ‘yes’ to each of this question,… Continue reading Consciousness: The Substratum Of Human Experience

Book Reviews, Buddhist Philosophy, Indian Philosophy, Kumarila Bhatta

The Buddhist Philosophy as presented in Mimamsa-Sloka-Varttika of Kumarila Bhatta

This book bring out the Buddhist Philosophical elements contained in the 'Mimamsa - Slokavarttika', the magnum opus of Kumarila Bhatta, the most prominent Purva Mimamsa Scholar (The other one is Prabhakara). He composed this work, 'Slokavarttika', to refute the arguments raised by Buddhist scholars, mainly Dignaga, Asanga, etc. As a considerable portion of the works… Continue reading The Buddhist Philosophy as presented in Mimamsa-Sloka-Varttika of Kumarila Bhatta

Advaita Vedanta, Indian Philosophy, Upanishads, Vedas

The Different Ways To Moksha

Karma Siddhanta put forward certain rules and guidelines to define actions into two categories – Good and Bad. These set of rules decided which action is good and which is bad. Vedas, Brahmanas, Upanishads, Bhagavat Gita, Smiritis, etc. were the commonly cited scriptures for a proper ethical and spiritual life. Guiding a life according to them, one can attain the perfect state of existence before or after death. Thus who performs the duties as propounded by the scriptures are sure to achieve moksha (roughly means, ‘liberation’), the perfect state, and who deviate from scriptural injections are destined to born again and again in the phenomenal world.